1. Microbiology & Food Hygiene

Novel strategies for food risk communication

Project Reference:

02-RESR-018

Status:

Completed

Commencement Date:

January, 2003

Project Duration:

24 months

Abstract:

The principal aim of this project was to develop new strategies for food risk communication by conducting an in-depth analysis of consumer understanding of scientific messages related to a variety of food risk issues, examining the potential barriers to effective risk communication and assessing differences in understanding within and between the various demographic groups in our society. 

This project aimed specifically to target social need in terms of addressing the needs of vulnerable groups such as low-income sectors of the population.

 

Principal Contractor(s):

Dr Mary McCarthy, University College Cork

Collaborator(s):

Dr Mary Brennan, Newcastle

Outputs:

Report:

Novel Strategies for Food Risk Communication

Peer review:

McCarthy, M & Brennan, M. (2009), Food risk communication: Some of the problems and issues faced by communicators on the Island of Ireland (IOI), Food Policy (34), 549-556. (2008). Speciality food orientation of food related lifestyle (FRL) segments in Great Britain. Food Quality and Preference, 19 (5), 498-510.

McCarthy, M., Brennan, M., DeBoer, M. & Ritson, C. (2008). Media risk communication - what was said by whom and how was it interpreted. Journal of Risk Research 11(3), 375-394.

Brennan M, McCarthy M. & Ritson C. (2007). Why do consumers deviate from best microbiological food safety advice? An examination of ‘high risk’ consumers on the island of Ireland. Appetite,49(2), 405-418.

McCarthy, M., Brennan, M., Kelly, A., Ritson, C., DeBoer, M and Thompson, N (2007). Who is at risk and what do they know? Segmenting a population on their food safety knowledge. Journal of Food Quality and Preference 18, 205-217.

McCarthy, M., Brennan, M., Ritson, C. and De Boer, M. (2006).  Food hazard characteristics and risk reduction behaviour: the view of consumers on the island of Ireland.  British Food Journal, 108(10), 875-891.