WHO guidelines on physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep for children under 5 years of age

A new report published by the WHO provides clear guidelines on physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep for children under 5 year of age.

Physical inactivity has been identified as a leading risk factor for global mortality and a contributor to the rise in overweight and obesity. Therefore, reducing screen time and improving the physical activity, and sleep behaviours of young children will contribute to their physical health, reduce the risk of developing obesity in childhood and the associated NCDs in later life and improve mental health and wellbeing.

Guidelines include:

Infants (less than 1 year) should:

  • Be physically active several times throughout the day in a variety of ways, particularly through floor based activity
  • Not be restrained (prams, high chairs, etc) for more than an hour at a time
  • Have 14-17 hours (0-3 months) or 12-16 hours (4-11 months) of good quality sleep, including naps
  • Screen time is not recommended for infants less than a year old

Children 1-2 years of age should:

  • Spend at least 180 minutes throughout the day in a variety of types of physical activity
  • Not be restrained for more than an hour at a time
  • Have 11- 14 hours of good quality sleep including naps
  • Screen time is not recommended for children of a year old and for 2 years old screen time should be limited to no more than 1 hour

 Children 3-4 years of age should:

  • Spend 180 minutes a day in a variety of types of physical activity at any intensity of which 60 minutes should be moderate- vigorous
  • Not be restrained for more than an hour at a time or sitting for extended periods of time
  • Have 10-13 hours of good quality sleep, which may include naps
  • Sedentary screen time should be no more than 1 hour, encouraging reading and storytelling as an alternative when sedentary

For more information on reducing daily screen time and increasing physical activity, check out our START campaign.

Posted: 26/04/2019 15:42:06 by Deirdre Brennan
Filed under: Children, Obesity, Overweight, Physical activity, Sedentary behaviour, Sleep


 

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