We all scream for ice cream

Do you eat a lot of ice cream over the summer? I know I do, so I thought it was time to find out the facts.

While I was doing my work placement at safefood I looked at the most popular brands of ice creams to check out the energy (in kilocalories) and sugar (in teaspoons) in each ice cream.

an ice cream and a blue sky

So, deep breath, take a look at the table below and find out the facts on your favourite.

(For both your standard tub of ice cream and your more luxurious ice creams, the energy and sugar displayed in the table is per your typical serving i.e. 75g, while energy and sugar for individual ice cream bars/cones/sticks and ice pops is displayed per serving as sold in shops.)

 

Per average serving (75g)

Ice cream tubs

Type

Energy (kcal)

Sugar (g)

Sugar (tsp)

Vanilla

Standard

130

15

4

Luxury

142

12

3

Chocolate

Standard

150

16

4

Luxury

204

19

5

Fruit

Standard

131

17

4

Luxury

197

19

5

Caramel / Toffee / Honeycomb

Standard

148

22

5.5

Luxury

181

18

4.5

 

Per serving as sold

Ice cream bars

Energy (kcal)

Sugar (g)

Sugar (tsp)

Ice Berger

187

17

4

Oreo sandwich

250

21

5

Ben and Jerry's sandwich

219

20

5

Mars

140

12

3

Snickers

179

13

3

 

Per serving as sold

Ice cream sticks

Energy (kcal)

Sugar (g)

Sugar (tsp)

Magnum (Classic)

244

21

5

Choc Ice

186

15

4

Solero (Exotic)

74

13

3

Maltesers

221

18

4.5

Brunch

170

12

3

Feast

234

18

4.5

Twister

76

13

3

 

Per serving as sold

Ice pops

Energy (kcal)

Sugar (g)

Sugar (tsp)

Calippo (Orange)

100

20

5

Mr. Freeze

28

3

1

Fab

82

11

3

Loop the Loop

85

13

3

Rowntrees Fruit Pastilles

53

12

3

 

Per serving as sold

Ice cream cones

Energy (kcal)

Sugar (g)

Sugar (tsp)

Whipped ice-cream, in a cone, with a Cadbury’s Flake

264

38

9.5

Cornetto (Classic - chocolate and vanilla)

187

13

3

Cadbury's Flake cone

238

19

5

Nestle Smarties cone

118

11

3

4g is approximately 1 teaspoon. Assessment of ice creams was carried out in May 2017.

Unsurprisingly, I found that the more luxurious ice creams have more energy and sugar than standard ice creams. This is due to them having energy-dense ingredients like sauces and cream. Overall, good news for you vanilla fans, it looks like vanilla is the healthier flavour to choose.

Of the ice cream bars, the ones that are advertised as "sandwiches" have the most energy and sugar.

Of the ice cream sticks, the Magnum Classic has more energy and sugar than the other ice cream sticks I looked at, while an Exotic Solero, a Brunch and a Twister had the least amount. This probably comes down to the fact that they don’t contain chocolate, while a Magnum does.

Of the ice pops, a Calippo was the most energy-dense and contained almost as much sugar as a Magnum. The childhood staple - a Mr Freeze ice pop - contained the lowest amounts of energy and sugar in the entire survey. This is because it’s sweetened with artificial sweeteners.

Of the ice cream cones, (and to my horror!), your typical ’99’ contained the most energy and sugar of all!

When it comes down to it, it seems ice pops are the better option to choose as they have almost half the calorie content of the other ice creams. That said, they still have a similar sugar content so next time you’re in your local store, why not look out for ones that don’t contain as much sugar?

Feeling adventurous? Visit the safefood Pinterest board to find some healthy and delicious ice pop recipes you can make with the kids.

Posted: 31/07/2017 10:14:23 by Alice Tarrant
Filed under: Ice cream, Students, Summer


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About Me

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Alice Tarrant
Hi. I’m a TY student from Coláiste na Toirbhirte Bandon, on work experience in safefood. I really love cooking and baking and making up my own recipes. I play football and camogie with my local club and also enjoy snuggling up on the sofa and watching a good film.